Customer Comments

Here's the latest comments from our customers, if you've got comments that you think would be useful for others to read, you can also make a comment on the individual product or blog page.

  1. Cici - Thursday, 02 March 2017 on product Non-Contact Infrared Thermometer
    Hi There

    Is this been calibrated? And where I could send to recalibration if needed?

    Cheers

    Cici

    thestripecafe@gmail.com
  2. AL - Sunday, 26 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi all, iSee can be cleanly detected now for modes it applies too. Can't see it yet, but we can detect that it is enabled by IR
  3. Petr Faitl - Thursday, 23 February 2017 on product Basic Components 20 Pack
    It would be nice to see some 220 ohm and 330 ohm resistors as well.
  4. Petr Faitl - Thursday, 23 February 2017 on product Basic Components 20 Pack
    It would be nice to see some 220 ohm and 330 ohm resistors as well.
  5. AL - Thursday, 23 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Hadley and others the wideVane setting is in the master branch now. Kayno and I have been working closely together to crack down on a lot of stuff. We also detect if temp byte is set in byte 19 at start up and use it for updates(0.5C) resolution as mentioned above.

    To all, if you have any questions or features you'd like to see just ask or open an issue on our git
    https://github.com/SwiCago/HeatPump

    Cheers
    -AL
  6. kayno - Thursday, 23 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Hadley - I have determined where wide vane is set:

    - the wide vane setting is sent on byte 18 (where first byte is 0)
    - the bitmap control byte value for this packet is set in byte 7 (not not 6 as for the other settings) and has a value of 0x01

    See the commit I made for the ESP library: https://github.com/SwiCago/HeatPump/pull/26/commits/bc04d52bd539c2a3fee71cef7db1... (Heatpump.cpp and Heatpump.h)

    If you need more info, just ask! Cheers to @SwiCago/AL for assisting with this.
  7. kayno - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @DMc I use the adafruit huzzah, as it's supports 5v power and the rx pin is 5v tolerant. I only had to tie the tx and rx to 5v with 2 resistors - no logic level converters or power regulators required. The feather is the same, but also has USB, so no FTDI cable needed.

    - huzzah: https://www.adafruit.com/products/2471 (you have to solder headers on to it, and need a USB FTDI cable to program)
    - feather: https://www.adafruit.com/products/3046 (headers already soldered in, normal USB cable to program)

    Whereabouts in the world are you? I have a couple of spare headers and could whip up some more cables to suit a huzzah/feather...
  8. DMc - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    This is awesome work, gents! I have many of this units (mostly MSZ-GE06NA-8) and am really looking forward to implementing these controllers. I have a SmartThings hub and will talk to them from there once it's up and running.

    Someone in the thread was wondering what the ECONOCOOL mode does. It sets the target temperature up four degrees (F) from the requested temp and turns on cycling of the vertical vanes. The theory is that having the air blow on you makes you feel cooler so you don't need to actually cool the room as much. Kind of a silly feature, in my opinion.

    I'm not that great with hardware. Can I hire anyone to build me a bunch of these controllers?
  9. kayno - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Jarrod - nice work on your library! Does it correctly set the wide vane? I had a quick look and it seems to send the same bytes in the same position for wide vane as https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump, but we can't get it to work. Be interested to know if you have...
  10. kayno - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Jarrod - nice work on your library! Does it correctly set the wide vane? I had a quick look and it seems to send the same bytes in the same position for wide vane as https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump, but we can't get it to work. Be interested to know if you have...
  11. AL - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Jarrod, Hadley. Yeah I figured out what that byte was after I posted. In my library we just sent all settings at once. I made a branch that will do combos like your PI one. I plan to roll that out after I get the 0.5C(@Jakob) settings tested. Seeing what was actually sent and received by the heatpump was interesting. I discovered the official KUMO cloud adapter also sends other info type requests and plan to figure out what those are for. Maybe they are used to ask the heatpump which model it is?
    Cheers
    -AL
  12. Jakob A - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL,

    It seems to me that the 6th byte is a bitmap of the values you want to change.
    In accordance to my earlier theory, 12th byte is the temp setting in 0.5 degrees C plus an offset of 128. It matches perfectly with your logs. For example A0= decimal 160 -> 16 C = 61 F.
    And also where you set FAN mode, the temp value is 80, which is 128, hence 0C. Makes sense, because in fan only mode, it should neither heat or cool, so the temp setting is irrelevant.

    Jakob
  13. Jarrod - Wednesday, 22 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    G'day all, good write up thanks a lot for the investigation and sharing the findings.

    I wrote (yet another) Arduino/ESP8266 library, if anyone wants to contribute or check it out at http://github.com/jarrod180/

    Also in Australia we call the Air Conditioners .... not sure about you blokes over there with your chilli bins and jandles.


    @AL - Look at hadley's code, the second byte of the tx settings message (after the kind designation of 0x01 for settings), there is a byte containing individual bits set for each setting contained in the message.

    I bet you had a great time with the logic analyser figuring this stuff out! Thanks again.
  14. AL - Tuesday, 21 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Hadley,
    We have been making strides with the library for ESP. For a few of us, depening on temperature set from remote, the ESP cannot figure it out as it differs slightly your codes.
    I got a little bored today and hooked up my Oscilloscope and dumped the Serial packets the official KUMO cloud device sends to the heatpump

    Here is what KUMO CLOUD sends for each mode
    FC,42,01,30,10,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,7B =>INFO
    FC,42,01,30,10,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,7A =>INFO_TEMP
    FC,42,01,30,10,04,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,79 => ???
    FC,42,01,30,10,09,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,74 => ???
    TP=Type,pw=power,md=mode,fs=fanSpeed,vv=vane,tF=temp
    FC,42,01,30,10,- -,TP,00,pw,md,00,fs,vv,00,00,00,00,00,00,tF,00,CHK
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CB => DRY
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,03,00,01,07,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F2 => FAN
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CC => HEAT
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CA =>COOL
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,05,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,D0 => OFF
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F4 =>FANQuiet
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F3 =>FAN1
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F2 =>FAN2
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,05,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F0 =>FAN3
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,06,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,EF =>FAN4
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F5 =>FANAuto
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,ED => VANEAuto
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,EC => VANE1
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,EB => VANE2
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,EB => VANE3
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,04,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,E9 => VANE4
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,05,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,E8 => VANE5
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,07,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,E6 => VANE_Swing

    COMBO settings
    HH,HH,HH,HH,HH,mp,MO,00,PW,MO,00,FS,VV,00,00,00,00,00,00,TT,00,CHK
    INFO : FC,42,01,30,10,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,7B
    INFO : FC,42,01,30,10,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,7A
    ???? : FC,42,01,30,10,04,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,79
    ???? : FC,42,01,30,10,09,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,74

    DRY : FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CB DRY ON
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,B2 DRY, FAN_Q,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,B1 DRY, FAN_1,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,AB DARY,VANEA,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,AA COOL, VANE1,88°

    FAN : FC,41,01,30,10,01,03,00,01,07,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F2 FAN ON
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F4 FAN, FAN_Q,NO_temp_setting
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,08,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,F3 FAN, FAN_1,NO_temp_setting
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,ED FAN, VANEA,NO_temp_setting
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,10,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,80,00,EC FAN, VANE1,NO_temp_setting

    HEAT : FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CC HEAT ON
    : FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,94,00,DC HEAT,FAN_Q,50°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,B2 HEAT,FAN_Q,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,94,00,D5 HEAT,VANEA,50°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,94,00,D4 HEAT,VANE1,50

    COOL : FC,41,01,30,10,01,07,00,01,03,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A8,00,CA COOL ON
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A0,00,D0 COOL, FAN_Q,61°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,A0,00,CF COOL, FAN 1,61°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,B2 COOL, FAN_Q,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,0C,00,00,00,00,02,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,B1 COOL, FAN_1,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,AB COOL, VANEA,88°
    FC,41,01,30,10,01,14,00,00,00,00,00,01,00,00,00,00,00,00,BE,00,AA COOL, VANE1,88°

    Looks like temp can always be sent, with any setting. It looks like there is a magic byte that says what the payload could contain. The above seems pretty easy to replicate and I am sure I could recode a branch of the library to do the above.
  15. Frank - Tuesday, 14 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi Guys,

    When will this be available again ?
  16. Jakob A - Tuesday, 14 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @kayno - Nice work! Thank you!

    It will still be a while before I can get to my heat pump and test things. Also waiting for some more electronics to arrive (come on China post!)

    I noticed something in your info packets: could the 7th byte could be the temperature in according to my previous theory?
    First one: ae = decimal 174 -> 174 - 128 = 46 -> 46 / 2 = 23 degrees C
    Second one: aa = decimal 170 -> 170 - 128 = 42 -> 42 / 2 = 21 degrees C
    Does it make sense?

    Also: the first packet has 'ac', was the heat pump set to 22 C?

    Thanks again!
    Jakob
  17. kayno - Monday, 13 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Jakob - i have added some debug code to my arduino sketch (it uses a new callback function i have added to @SwiCago's library). My fork is here: https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump. Once I connect the ESP8266 to the heatpump I can turn on/off debug mode by sending a message "on"/"off" to the MQTT heatpump/debug/set topic, and then it starts to send each packet as a message on the heatpump/debug topic, like this:

    heatpump/debug/set on // this was me sending "on" to the topic to enable debug mode
    heatpump/debug debug mode enabled // confirmation from ESP8266 that debug mode is enabled, packet dumping will commence
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 00 07 09 02 01 00 00 0c ac 00 00 00 00 "} // settings packet with settings, e.g. temp, mode, power, vanes, etc
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"03 00 00 0d 00 00 ae 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 "} // info packet with room temp

    So then i switched mode to HEAT and hit the iSave button:

    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 01 01 0f 00 00 00 00 03 94 00 00 00 00 "} // settings packet, after pressing isave and down to 10 degrees C, it now contains the 0x94 you found
    heatpump {"power":"ON","mode":"HEAT","temperature":16,"fan":"AUTO","vane":"AUTO","wideVane":"|"} // ESP8266 acknowledges the change (reports temp is 16 because it doesn't know how to interpret isave 10C yet)
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"03 00 00 0b 00 00 aa 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 "} // info packet with room temp
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 01 01 0f 00 00 00 00 03 94 00 00 00 00 " // still got that 0x94 in the settings packet...

    I think some more debugging is required to suss this out - push a button, check the output, repeat! I might write a script that I can run on my laptop that reads the MQTT debug topic and processes each packet and formats/displays it nicely to assist.

    ESP8266/arduino discussion is continuing here: http://www.esp8266.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=13207
  18. George - Saturday, 11 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Didn't really here anything back on a question I asked last year. Just wanted to know whether anyone is using the HD Homerun Connect with the Nvidia Shield Console and Google Live Channels? Would like to know how well it performs and whether the EPG works. Cheers
  19. Hadley Rich - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    That depends on what system you're using.
  20. Bernie - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi,

    I seem to only get one day of TV guide, where is the rest?
  21. Bernie - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi,

    I seem to only get one day of TV guide, where is the rest?
  22. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    The problem with just setting the temperature to max heat on the minisplit is that then the compressor kicks on to max and that lowers efficiency a lot. Ideally the unit should always be modulating, which is how it normally works with the internal sensor, but the problem is that in heat mode the hot air tends to accumulate on the ceiling and the unit thinks the room is hotter than it really is. Here's a thread someone posted showing this:

    http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/mechanicals/38983/mitsubishi...

    They monitored the power consumption and found it was spiking up and down when using the internal temperature sensor, but when they connected the MHK1 the power consumption became much smoother. This leads me to believe that the MHK1 is transmitting the current room temperature to the minisplit and the minisplit is using that temperature, instead of its own temperature sensor.
  23. Jakob A - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Heys guys,

    I think I figured out the temperature values.
    I seems like it is temperature in 0.5 degrees C plus an offset of 128 (presumably to allow negative temperatures without using negative values)

    10 C = 0x94 = 148 = 128 + 10 * 2
    16 C = 0xa0 = 160 = 128 + 16 * 2
    31 C = 0xbe = 190 = 128 + 31 * 2

    kayno - did you get any data logged when setting temperature < 16 C ?
    As I said before, my heatpump is in a remote location and it will be a while before I can go there.

    Cheers,
    Jakob
  24. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Mitsubishi makes the MHK1 remote thermostat which consists of their MRCH1 wireless thermostat and a MIFH1 wireless receiver which plugs into the CN105 port and receives the commands from the remote thermostat and tells the heat pump what to do. This is very handy as the internal thermosistor on the heat pump head can be quite inaccurate, especially used in heating mode. You can put the wireless remote thermostat wherever you want the temperature to be (like by your bed) and then the heat pump ignores the internal thermosistor and instead uses the values provided by the remote thermostat as the "current temperature".

    So the CN105 port must have a way of telling the heat pump what the "current temperature" is. Has anyone seen this protocol deciphered anywhere (one would probably need to sniff what the MIFH1 is sending over the CN105 port). I would like to build something similar to the MHK1 where I have an ESP8266 plugged into the heat pump and another one somewhere else with a temperature sensor on it, and that becomes the remote thermostat.
  25. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Mitsubishi makes the MHK1 remote thermostat which consists of their MRCH1 wireless thermostat and a MIFH1 wireless receiver which plugs into the CN105 port and receives the commands from the remote thermostat and tells the heat pump what to do. This is very handy as the internal thermosistor on the heat pump head can be quite inaccurate, especially used in heating mode. You can put the wireless remote thermostat wherever you want the temperature to be (like by your bed) and then the heat pump ignores the internal thermosistor and instead uses the values provided by the remote thermostat as the "current temperature".

    So the CN105 port must have a way of telling the heat pump what the "current temperature" is. Has anyone seen this protocol deciphered anywhere (one would probably need to sniff what the MIFH1 is sending over the CN105 port). I would like to build something similar to the MHK1 where I have an ESP8266 plugged into the heat pump and another one somewhere else with a temperature sensor on it, and that becomes the remote thermostat.
  26. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  27. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  28. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  29. Hadley Rich - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Probably easier to ask questions here since it's the source of the protocol info etc., has people who can answer, and is available for the public to see.
  30. AL - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi guys, wow what a discussion. Been offline for a while, been re-wiring my entire house.
    Alberto, I commented on your question on esp forum, but see you got it working. Yes the heat pumps have an initialize time. That is why I made sure in my library you can re-send the connect message. By default it does this as soon as it is plugged in, as you do not need to turn power off to plug in. I have tested my GIT code on both ducted and non-ducted units. For ducted, vane settings are ignored, the units are smart enough to ignor what they don't have. Also, no point in asking the unit what it is, since you the hacker already know that LOL.
    Unreality forked from my main branch, right before I updated the entire package to read from heatpump, Kanyo forked from unreality, so his won't have any of the new code I put in my branch either. My read from heatpump is done automatically as part of your main loop hp.sync(), instead of on-demand see my git examples. The values are saved in current_settings and can be pulled with any of the methods that read from it, but getSettings(settings*) will get them all at once.
    Alberto, Kanyo, Unreality, Hadley you guys can always email me with any suggestions or questions. I posted my email before, but I'll post it again
    al (at) swicago (dot) com
    I do check my email often and will periodically check esp8266.com

    Cheers
    -AL
  31. Alberto - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    This week i will implement in my domoticz with mqtt.

    Kayno has can you solved the problem of 28ºC when start heat mode?

    Thanks in advance!!!!!
  32. Matt Black - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on product Draytek Vigor 120 ADSL2+ Modem/Router with bridge
    Can anyone check the polarity of the AC adaptor for me please? I need a new one in the UK but can't find this info anywhere..

    http://electronics.stackexchange.com/a/85550
  33. Alberto - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    At last!!!!!!!!
    I've got it working perfect. The problem was that the heat pump takes 2 minutes to start and the connection packet is sent just as the module esp8266 is turned on. I added a delay of 2 minutes and finally works perfect. Thanks Hadley, al, kayno !!!!!!!. The only thing is that when I turn on the heat pump with mqtt it lights up with 28th, otherwise everything works perfect. So the code of headley, al, kayno works perfect in unit pead rp100 ja (European model)
  34. Alberto - Monday, 06 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi hadley,

    Your code would work with mycropyhton?

    Wittycloud can load mycropython firmware.

    Thanks in advance.
  35. kayno - Sunday, 05 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Alberto - which sketch are you using with the arduino library?

    If you haven't already, I would try AL's library and the HP_cntrl_esp8266 script. This will give you an "esp8266" ssid to connect to, and then when you try to use your browser you should get forced to a page that allows you to connect to the heatpump and change settings.
  36. Alberto - Saturday, 04 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I think dont work because header structure bytes is different for each model mitsu.


    How would you figure out the data structure of my heat pump model?

    Thanks!!!!
  37. Alberto - Saturday, 04 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi,

    I have tried kayno's and al's code with witty cloud to my hp.

    don't work. does nothing.

    :(

    How could it work?

    Thanks everyone.
  38. Johnny K. - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Low Power Arduino Tutorial
    Found another good article about CR2032 coin cell: https://www.hackster.io/Talk2/temp-and-humidity-sensor-with-a-cr2032-for-over-1-...
  39. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    My unit is european pead-rp-100ja (ducted) ( no vane horizontal)(no direction).

    I will try kayno code tomorrow.

    I think dont' work because my unit is different group code than yours.

    Tomorrow i say you

    Regards.
  40. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I think the group codes are the different sets of serial commands for the different air conditioning units. In other words, depending on each mitsu model, a groupcode is used. It is then the adapter that is responsible for choosing the right one depending on the model of heat pump and send the correct group code to the heat pump
  41. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi jakob, i have the mac-557-ife adaptor but i dont know capture the traffic .

    i tried but i dont know do it.

    Regards
  42. Jakob A - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi all,

    unreality - good find. I looked at the stuff at https://github.com/ncaunt/meldec
    It does indeed look like it sends the serial commands/responses over the net.
    There was a sample capture there, I decoded a bit of it and put it here I anyone wants to look:
    https://gist.github.com/anonymous/cfd1cd3bed730024daa665b29aa0bdcd

    There seems to be more to this protocol. Looking at the XML, there is a groupcode, which seems to be the first byte after the header, and there are many groupcodes used.

    Alberto - since you have the real hardware, are you able to capture the traffic? Network traffic and/or the serial comms between the wifi adapter and the heatpump?

    Cheers,
    Jakob
  43. Alberto - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Thanks a lot of Kayno!!!!!!

    I will try this weekend.

    Thanks.
  44. kayno - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Sorry, example at https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump/blob/master/examples/mitsubishi_heatpump_mqtt_... (fixed path)
  45. kayno - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Pushed my fork back up to github: https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump

    Just did some testing on this tonight and seems pretty good now. I did seem to get a random temperature change when I initially switched it ON (last temp was 24 so not sure where 31 came from) but that could be an issue in my sketch or homeassistant (HASS) setup.

  46. Jakob A - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno!

    Thanks for looking into it! Were you able to set anything other than 10 degrees?
    I will try with other temps and look at what data I get. The problem is that this heatpump is a one and a half hour drive (one way) away. (Which would make remote control really helpful!) And I have other plans for the two coming weekends.

    MQTT debug topic seems like a good idea! Do you have any code to share yet?

    Cheers!
    Jakob
  47. Jakob A - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno!

    Thanks for looking into it! Were you able to set anything other than 10 degrees?
    I will try with other temps and look at what data I get. The problem is that this heatpump is a one and a half hour drive (one way) away. (Which would make remote control really helpful!) And I have other plans for the two coming weekends.

    MQTT debug topic seems like a good idea! Do you have any code to share yet?

    Cheers!
    Jakob
  48. kayno - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    hi unreality!

    Your fork (https://github.com/unreality/HeatPump) was most helpful, thanks!! I will get my fork up on github tonight for you to see - would be great to try and get all the changes back into one library somewhere :)

    Cheers
    Kayne
  49. kayno - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    (sorry for all the posts, trying to cover everything!)

    Jakob A - I am able to get lower temps in iSave mode. I wasn't able to get Hadley's code working on my laptop using a USB to serial converter though, so I haven't been able to look at the packets coming back when iSave mode is used. Your deductions with the -100 and Fahrenheit looks promising though - maybe try some more temperatures to see if it continues to compute?

    I might look at adding some more debug code to my ESP8266 arduino sketch to send the received packet data out to a debug MQTT topic. that might allow me to help you.

    I would also like to control some of the other functions on my model, like "POWERFUL" mode (possibly just an extra fan mode, but the manual says it's for heat and cool modes only, and that in this mode the temperature can't be set), "LONG" (increased fan speed, horizontal vane is full up to "throw" the air longer), and "ECONO COOL" (manual reads: "the manual performs swing operation vertically in various cycles according to the temperature of airflows" - sounds like a circus act!). Would be interesting to see of these are specific bytes for other "operation modes" in the data stream, or if they are just "pre-canned" settings, e.g. LONG is most likely just highest fan speed, highest horizontal vane setting.
  50. kayno - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hadley - thanks for the info. It was a bit unnerving when it happened, and without knowing that it needed to be off at the mains isolator for 60secs to get out of flashing mode (i tried a couple of times for 20-30s thinking it would be ample), I was quite worried it was going to be a costly exercise to get the main board replaced!

    I have soldiered on though, and seem to have most things working now. Still a little bit of work to go though!

    AL, unreality's fork of your code has some excellent additions, including the checkForUpdate() function. I have forked unreality's code and started to make some changes myself, but this has mostly resolved around removing magic numbers and trying to make the code more readable. I have some more ideas to improve it, however I am thinking we could continue that conversation on the esp8266 forum where you posted your code?

    I'm also working on my home assistant integration as well, and I will post my config when I am done. So far I have home assistant displaying the current state (via an MQTT broker), which looks like this: http://i.imgur.com/0VYAByU.png

    Once I have it working so that I can control it from home assistant, I can start to fully automate things - "switch on the heatpump to HEAT in winter when I am 20 mins away from home and it's below 20C", "send me a push notification if i leave the house but leave the heatpump on, and allow me to switch it off or acknowledge that I want to leave it on (or turn it off if i don't respond)" - all possible now :)

    thanks everyone!