Customer Comments

Here's the latest comments from our customers, if you've got comments that you think would be useful for others to read, you can also make a comment on the individual product or blog page.

  1. Frank - Tuesday, 14 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi Guys,

    When will this be available again ?
  2. Jakob A - Tuesday, 14 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @kayno - Nice work! Thank you!

    It will still be a while before I can get to my heat pump and test things. Also waiting for some more electronics to arrive (come on China post!)

    I noticed something in your info packets: could the 7th byte could be the temperature in according to my previous theory?
    First one: ae = decimal 174 -> 174 - 128 = 46 -> 46 / 2 = 23 degrees C
    Second one: aa = decimal 170 -> 170 - 128 = 42 -> 42 / 2 = 21 degrees C
    Does it make sense?

    Also: the first packet has 'ac', was the heat pump set to 22 C?

    Thanks again!
    Jakob
  3. kayno - Monday, 13 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    @Jakob - i have added some debug code to my arduino sketch (it uses a new callback function i have added to @SwiCago's library). My fork is here: https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump. Once I connect the ESP8266 to the heatpump I can turn on/off debug mode by sending a message "on"/"off" to the MQTT heatpump/debug/set topic, and then it starts to send each packet as a message on the heatpump/debug topic, like this:

    heatpump/debug/set on // this was me sending "on" to the topic to enable debug mode
    heatpump/debug debug mode enabled // confirmation from ESP8266 that debug mode is enabled, packet dumping will commence
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 00 07 09 02 01 00 00 0c ac 00 00 00 00 "} // settings packet with settings, e.g. temp, mode, power, vanes, etc
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"03 00 00 0d 00 00 ae 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 "} // info packet with room temp

    So then i switched mode to HEAT and hit the iSave button:

    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 01 01 0f 00 00 00 00 03 94 00 00 00 00 "} // settings packet, after pressing isave and down to 10 degrees C, it now contains the 0x94 you found
    heatpump {"power":"ON","mode":"HEAT","temperature":16,"fan":"AUTO","vane":"AUTO","wideVane":"|"} // ESP8266 acknowledges the change (reports temp is 16 because it doesn't know how to interpret isave 10C yet)
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"03 00 00 0b 00 00 aa 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 "} // info packet with room temp
    heatpump/debug {"packet":"02 00 00 01 01 0f 00 00 00 00 03 94 00 00 00 00 " // still got that 0x94 in the settings packet...

    I think some more debugging is required to suss this out - push a button, check the output, repeat! I might write a script that I can run on my laptop that reads the MQTT debug topic and processes each packet and formats/displays it nicely to assist.

    ESP8266/arduino discussion is continuing here: http://www.esp8266.com/viewtopic.php?f=29&t=13207
  4. George - Saturday, 11 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Didn't really here anything back on a question I asked last year. Just wanted to know whether anyone is using the HD Homerun Connect with the Nvidia Shield Console and Google Live Channels? Would like to know how well it performs and whether the EPG works. Cheers
  5. Hadley Rich - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    That depends on what system you're using.
  6. Bernie - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi,

    I seem to only get one day of TV guide, where is the rest?
  7. Bernie - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on product SiliconDust HDHomeRun Connect
    Hi,

    I seem to only get one day of TV guide, where is the rest?
  8. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    The problem with just setting the temperature to max heat on the minisplit is that then the compressor kicks on to max and that lowers efficiency a lot. Ideally the unit should always be modulating, which is how it normally works with the internal sensor, but the problem is that in heat mode the hot air tends to accumulate on the ceiling and the unit thinks the room is hotter than it really is. Here's a thread someone posted showing this:

    http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/mechanicals/38983/mitsubishi...

    They monitored the power consumption and found it was spiking up and down when using the internal temperature sensor, but when they connected the MHK1 the power consumption became much smoother. This leads me to believe that the MHK1 is transmitting the current room temperature to the minisplit and the minisplit is using that temperature, instead of its own temperature sensor.
  9. Jakob A - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Heys guys,

    I think I figured out the temperature values.
    I seems like it is temperature in 0.5 degrees C plus an offset of 128 (presumably to allow negative temperatures without using negative values)

    10 C = 0x94 = 148 = 128 + 10 * 2
    16 C = 0xa0 = 160 = 128 + 16 * 2
    31 C = 0xbe = 190 = 128 + 31 * 2

    kayno - did you get any data logged when setting temperature < 16 C ?
    As I said before, my heatpump is in a remote location and it will be a while before I can go there.

    Cheers,
    Jakob
  10. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Mitsubishi makes the MHK1 remote thermostat which consists of their MRCH1 wireless thermostat and a MIFH1 wireless receiver which plugs into the CN105 port and receives the commands from the remote thermostat and tells the heat pump what to do. This is very handy as the internal thermosistor on the heat pump head can be quite inaccurate, especially used in heating mode. You can put the wireless remote thermostat wherever you want the temperature to be (like by your bed) and then the heat pump ignores the internal thermosistor and instead uses the values provided by the remote thermostat as the "current temperature".

    So the CN105 port must have a way of telling the heat pump what the "current temperature" is. Has anyone seen this protocol deciphered anywhere (one would probably need to sniff what the MIFH1 is sending over the CN105 port). I would like to build something similar to the MHK1 where I have an ESP8266 plugged into the heat pump and another one somewhere else with a temperature sensor on it, and that becomes the remote thermostat.
  11. Nick - Wednesday, 08 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Mitsubishi makes the MHK1 remote thermostat which consists of their MRCH1 wireless thermostat and a MIFH1 wireless receiver which plugs into the CN105 port and receives the commands from the remote thermostat and tells the heat pump what to do. This is very handy as the internal thermosistor on the heat pump head can be quite inaccurate, especially used in heating mode. You can put the wireless remote thermostat wherever you want the temperature to be (like by your bed) and then the heat pump ignores the internal thermosistor and instead uses the values provided by the remote thermostat as the "current temperature".

    So the CN105 port must have a way of telling the heat pump what the "current temperature" is. Has anyone seen this protocol deciphered anywhere (one would probably need to sniff what the MIFH1 is sending over the CN105 port). I would like to build something similar to the MHK1 where I have an ESP8266 plugged into the heat pump and another one somewhere else with a temperature sensor on it, and that becomes the remote thermostat.
  12. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  13. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  14. kayno - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi AL - I just posted over at esp8266.com, but I see it is moderated too. I feel like I have stepped back into 2005! Do they moderate all posts a user makes, or just the first few to establish trust?
  15. Hadley Rich - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Probably easier to ask questions here since it's the source of the protocol info etc., has people who can answer, and is available for the public to see.
  16. AL - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi guys, wow what a discussion. Been offline for a while, been re-wiring my entire house.
    Alberto, I commented on your question on esp forum, but see you got it working. Yes the heat pumps have an initialize time. That is why I made sure in my library you can re-send the connect message. By default it does this as soon as it is plugged in, as you do not need to turn power off to plug in. I have tested my GIT code on both ducted and non-ducted units. For ducted, vane settings are ignored, the units are smart enough to ignor what they don't have. Also, no point in asking the unit what it is, since you the hacker already know that LOL.
    Unreality forked from my main branch, right before I updated the entire package to read from heatpump, Kanyo forked from unreality, so his won't have any of the new code I put in my branch either. My read from heatpump is done automatically as part of your main loop hp.sync(), instead of on-demand see my git examples. The values are saved in current_settings and can be pulled with any of the methods that read from it, but getSettings(settings*) will get them all at once.
    Alberto, Kanyo, Unreality, Hadley you guys can always email me with any suggestions or questions. I posted my email before, but I'll post it again
    al (at) swicago (dot) com
    I do check my email often and will periodically check esp8266.com

    Cheers
    -AL
  17. Alberto - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    This week i will implement in my domoticz with mqtt.

    Kayno has can you solved the problem of 28ºC when start heat mode?

    Thanks in advance!!!!!
  18. Matt Black - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on product Draytek Vigor 120 ADSL2+ Modem/Router with bridge
    Can anyone check the polarity of the AC adaptor for me please? I need a new one in the UK but can't find this info anywhere..

    http://electronics.stackexchange.com/a/85550
  19. Alberto - Tuesday, 07 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    At last!!!!!!!!
    I've got it working perfect. The problem was that the heat pump takes 2 minutes to start and the connection packet is sent just as the module esp8266 is turned on. I added a delay of 2 minutes and finally works perfect. Thanks Hadley, al, kayno !!!!!!!. The only thing is that when I turn on the heat pump with mqtt it lights up with 28th, otherwise everything works perfect. So the code of headley, al, kayno works perfect in unit pead rp100 ja (European model)
  20. Alberto - Monday, 06 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi hadley,

    Your code would work with mycropyhton?

    Wittycloud can load mycropython firmware.

    Thanks in advance.
  21. kayno - Sunday, 05 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Alberto - which sketch are you using with the arduino library?

    If you haven't already, I would try AL's library and the HP_cntrl_esp8266 script. This will give you an "esp8266" ssid to connect to, and then when you try to use your browser you should get forced to a page that allows you to connect to the heatpump and change settings.
  22. Alberto - Saturday, 04 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I think dont work because header structure bytes is different for each model mitsu.


    How would you figure out the data structure of my heat pump model?

    Thanks!!!!
  23. Alberto - Saturday, 04 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi,

    I have tried kayno's and al's code with witty cloud to my hp.

    don't work. does nothing.

    :(

    How could it work?

    Thanks everyone.
  24. Johnny K. - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Low Power Arduino Tutorial
    Found another good article about CR2032 coin cell: https://www.hackster.io/Talk2/temp-and-humidity-sensor-with-a-cr2032-for-over-1-...
  25. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    My unit is european pead-rp-100ja (ducted) ( no vane horizontal)(no direction).

    I will try kayno code tomorrow.

    I think dont' work because my unit is different group code than yours.

    Tomorrow i say you

    Regards.
  26. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I think the group codes are the different sets of serial commands for the different air conditioning units. In other words, depending on each mitsu model, a groupcode is used. It is then the adapter that is responsible for choosing the right one depending on the model of heat pump and send the correct group code to the heat pump
  27. Alberto - Thursday, 02 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi jakob, i have the mac-557-ife adaptor but i dont know capture the traffic .

    i tried but i dont know do it.

    Regards
  28. Jakob A - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi all,

    unreality - good find. I looked at the stuff at https://github.com/ncaunt/meldec
    It does indeed look like it sends the serial commands/responses over the net.
    There was a sample capture there, I decoded a bit of it and put it here I anyone wants to look:
    https://gist.github.com/anonymous/cfd1cd3bed730024daa665b29aa0bdcd

    There seems to be more to this protocol. Looking at the XML, there is a groupcode, which seems to be the first byte after the header, and there are many groupcodes used.

    Alberto - since you have the real hardware, are you able to capture the traffic? Network traffic and/or the serial comms between the wifi adapter and the heatpump?

    Cheers,
    Jakob
  29. Alberto - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Thanks a lot of Kayno!!!!!!

    I will try this weekend.

    Thanks.
  30. kayno - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Sorry, example at https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump/blob/master/examples/mitsubishi_heatpump_mqtt_... (fixed path)
  31. kayno - Wednesday, 01 February 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Pushed my fork back up to github: https://github.com/kayno/HeatPump

    Just did some testing on this tonight and seems pretty good now. I did seem to get a random temperature change when I initially switched it ON (last temp was 24 so not sure where 31 came from) but that could be an issue in my sketch or homeassistant (HASS) setup.

  32. Jakob A - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno!

    Thanks for looking into it! Were you able to set anything other than 10 degrees?
    I will try with other temps and look at what data I get. The problem is that this heatpump is a one and a half hour drive (one way) away. (Which would make remote control really helpful!) And I have other plans for the two coming weekends.

    MQTT debug topic seems like a good idea! Do you have any code to share yet?

    Cheers!
    Jakob
  33. Jakob A - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno!

    Thanks for looking into it! Were you able to set anything other than 10 degrees?
    I will try with other temps and look at what data I get. The problem is that this heatpump is a one and a half hour drive (one way) away. (Which would make remote control really helpful!) And I have other plans for the two coming weekends.

    MQTT debug topic seems like a good idea! Do you have any code to share yet?

    Cheers!
    Jakob
  34. kayno - Tuesday, 31 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    hi unreality!

    Your fork (https://github.com/unreality/HeatPump) was most helpful, thanks!! I will get my fork up on github tonight for you to see - would be great to try and get all the changes back into one library somewhere :)

    Cheers
    Kayne
  35. kayno - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    (sorry for all the posts, trying to cover everything!)

    Jakob A - I am able to get lower temps in iSave mode. I wasn't able to get Hadley's code working on my laptop using a USB to serial converter though, so I haven't been able to look at the packets coming back when iSave mode is used. Your deductions with the -100 and Fahrenheit looks promising though - maybe try some more temperatures to see if it continues to compute?

    I might look at adding some more debug code to my ESP8266 arduino sketch to send the received packet data out to a debug MQTT topic. that might allow me to help you.

    I would also like to control some of the other functions on my model, like "POWERFUL" mode (possibly just an extra fan mode, but the manual says it's for heat and cool modes only, and that in this mode the temperature can't be set), "LONG" (increased fan speed, horizontal vane is full up to "throw" the air longer), and "ECONO COOL" (manual reads: "the manual performs swing operation vertically in various cycles according to the temperature of airflows" - sounds like a circus act!). Would be interesting to see of these are specific bytes for other "operation modes" in the data stream, or if they are just "pre-canned" settings, e.g. LONG is most likely just highest fan speed, highest horizontal vane setting.
  36. kayno - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hadley - thanks for the info. It was a bit unnerving when it happened, and without knowing that it needed to be off at the mains isolator for 60secs to get out of flashing mode (i tried a couple of times for 20-30s thinking it would be ample), I was quite worried it was going to be a costly exercise to get the main board replaced!

    I have soldiered on though, and seem to have most things working now. Still a little bit of work to go though!

    AL, unreality's fork of your code has some excellent additions, including the checkForUpdate() function. I have forked unreality's code and started to make some changes myself, but this has mostly resolved around removing magic numbers and trying to make the code more readable. I have some more ideas to improve it, however I am thinking we could continue that conversation on the esp8266 forum where you posted your code?

    I'm also working on my home assistant integration as well, and I will post my config when I am done. So far I have home assistant displaying the current state (via an MQTT broker), which looks like this: http://i.imgur.com/0VYAByU.png

    Once I have it working so that I can control it from home assistant, I can start to fully automate things - "switch on the heatpump to HEAT in winter when I am 20 mins away from home and it's below 20C", "send me a push notification if i leave the house but leave the heatpump on, and allow me to switch it off or acknowledge that I want to leave it on (or turn it off if i don't respond)" - all possible now :)

    thanks everyone!
  37. kayno - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Alberto - I do not have anything connected to the RESET or CH_PD (labelled as EN) on the HUZZAH, however the HUZZAH itself connects them as follows:

    - RST - this is the reset pin for the ESP8266, pulled high by default. When pulled down to ground momentarily it will reset the ESP8266 system. This pin is 5V compliant.

    - EN (CH_PD) - This is the enable pin for the ESP8266, pulled high by default. When pulled down to ground momentarily it will reset the ESP8266 system. This pin is 3.3V logic only

    I connect the 5V and GND from the heatpump to the V+ and GND on the HUZZAH. I also connect the RX and TX from the heatpump to the TX and RX on the HUZZAH. I have 10k resistors from each of these lines to the 5V line.

    The HUZZAH RX pin is 5v tolerant ("there is a level shifter on this pin") however the TX is 3.3V logic - but it seems to be enough to transmit commands to the heatpump as I can control it with the HUZZAH.
  38. Alberto - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno,

    With witty cloud (esp8266-12) is neccesary ch_pd pin ans rst pin to vcc?

    In the Al diagram the resistors are in parallel, with witty cloud (same as huzzah) resistors are in parallel o in line?

    Thanks in advance
  39. Alberto - Monday, 30 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno,

    With witty cloud (esp8266-12) is neccesary ch_pd pin ans rst pin to vcc?

    In the Al diagram the resistors are in parallel, with witty cloud (same as huzzah) resistors are in parallel o in line?

    Thanks in advance
  40. kayno - Saturday, 28 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    crisis averted!

    in the panic of not being able to get it to switch on, I switched it off at the mains and pulled the cover and control board panel off and removed the CN105 cable (figured at that stage i should, as a repairman would likely be visiting!) and put it all back together. Whilst reassembling, I noted a sticker that also had the troubleshooting codes, and it just said "switch off power and wait 60s" - it did not go into the detail of the service manual, but the service manual didn't mention "60s". I went and switched back on the mains isolator (it had been off for several minutes whilst i removed the cable), and when i went back in side and pressed "ON" on the remote, it came to life! no more flashing LED, just lots of cold air.

    unfortunately now my wife won't be happy if I plug the cable back in. 31C, 30C and 36C forecast for the next 3 days, and if there is no air con when it's that hot because I blew it up... anyone know how much the "Indoor electronic control P.C. board" costs, if were to need replacing? I need to do a cost/benefit analysis before continuing. Is there any risk here in breaking it? Hadley, did you ever have the flashing LED problem?
  41. kayno - Friday, 27 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Uh oh - I think I have caused a fault in the heatpump :(

    The "operation" LED indicator is flashing a on/off for 0.5secs/0.5secs, which according to the service manual is a serial signal error (page 30 of https://www.mitsubishielectric.com.au/assets/LEG/OBH531E.pdf)

    https://www.mitsubishielectric.com.au/assets/LEG/OBH531E.pdf gives a procedure to rectify (page 37) which i am working through. I switched the unit off at the mains isolator, waited 30secs, switched it back on, and then pressed the emergency switch as it says. The operation LED starts the same flashing again, and continues even after the 6 mins mentioned in the manual.

    I was starting to get somewhere too - I had AL's code controlling power/mode/fan/vane over mqtt, but it couldn't read the current settings. i switched to unreality's fork (https://github.com/unreality/HeatPump) as they seem to have done extended work on reading the status, but it wasn't reading the status of the heatpump either. I turned on the heatpump via the remote, and thats when the operation LED started flashing. When i realised it wasn't working, I disconnected the ESP8266, and started troubleshooting.

    If anyone has any ideas to help me? I just need to get the heatpump working again, or else my other half is going to be quite upset. My wallet will be upset too if I have killed the control board... or worse :(
  42. Alberto - Friday, 27 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    witty cloud esp8266 has a voltage regulator. Do you know if ch_pd pin supports 5v directly from hp?

    Thanks
  43. Alberto - Friday, 27 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I have mac-557-ife (mitsubishi oficial adapter wifi for melcloud),
    but I can not connect directly to the unit, since melcloud is through the cloud. I would like to be able to hack this device or make mine own as you have done. I have the witty cloud esp8266 and I would like to know if I also have to join the vcc of 5V the pins of rest and ch_pd. Thanks !!!!!!!
  44. kayno - Friday, 27 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    I'm starting to get a bit worried about blowing the heatpump up! I am not making progress, and when i connected the ESP8266 just now, the head unit started a continuous beep and didn't stop until i flipped the isolator switch on the external unit!

    upon turning it back on, it didn't beep, and seems to be fine. now I am paranoid about breaking it!!
  45. kayno - Thursday, 26 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Alberto - Diagram for the cable I made? I used AL's: https://github.com/SwiCago/HeatPump/blob/master/CN105_ESP8266.png. Because the Huzzah supports 5v, I was able to create a simple cable from the heatpump to the huzzah, with the 2x 10k resistors inline, and wrapped up with heat shrink. I should have photographed it as I went, but I didn't and it's all shrunk now!

    My progress is slow. Whilst I can change settings with AL's ESP8266 code, I can't read the status from the heat pump. Nothing is coming back on the serial. Any thoughts AL, others? I have tried Serial.read, and Serial.readString in the main loop() and Serial.available() is returning > 0 but nothing comes back from Serial.read(). All a bit odd, given that if I use AL's library I can switch it on/off.

  46. Alberto - Thursday, 26 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi Kayno,

    Can you post your diagram please?.

    Thanks in advance.
  47. Daniel Currie - Thursday, 26 January 2017 on product Grandstream HandyTone 702 ATA
    I have purchased one of these to use with 2talk - is there a configuration instruction sheet you can provide?
  48. Jakob A - Wednesday, 25 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi kayno,

    Yes, if I select the i-save mode, pressing the temp minus button, it jumps from 16 to 10.
    The manual for my model says:
    "Normally, the minimum temperature setting in HEAT mode is 16°C.
    However, during i-save operation only, the minimum temperature setting
    is 10°C."

    I found the manual for your model and it states the same.
    Note that is says in HEAT mode, did you try it in HEAT mode?

    Really interested in getting MQTT on the ESP8266, it would fit my use case quite nicely.

    Speculating further:
    As in my previous post, when set to 10 C, the 12th byte is hex 94, 16 C is a0 and 31 C is be.
    In decimal:
    94 = 148
    a0 = 160
    be = 190

    Which is roughly the temp in F + 100:
    148 - 100 = 48 F = 8.9 C
    160 - 100 = 60 F = 15.6 C
    190 - 100 = 90 F = 32.2 C

    I might be on to something?
    Thanks Hadley, AL, kayno and everyone else contributing.
  49. kayno - Wednesday, 25 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    hi guys

    I have just hooked up an ESP8266 (the adafruit huzzah version which has an onboard regulator and can take the 5v directly from the CN105 port) to my heatpump - MSZ-GE80VA2.

    I used the PAP-05V-S JST PA 5 way connector, and RS components had ready-made 300mm leads (SPHD1-SS5-24300) with the crimp contact already installed, so you just push the wires into the connector housing.

    - http://au.rs-online.com/web/p/pcb-connector-housings/4766798/
    - http://au.rs-online.com/web/p/serial-cable-assemblies/5128737/

    I used AL's https://github.com/SwiCago/HeatPump.git, and have just tried the HP_cntrl_esp8266 example script. I was able to switch it on and off, so looks like it's working.

    Jakob - I have an i-save button on my remote but I have never used it. I pressed it then, but I was still limited to 16-31 degrees. Is it just a case of pressing iSave and then the +/- temp buttons?

    I'm going to use the arduino library and write some code to enable MQTT messages to control the heatpump. I will then try and integrate with home-assistant.io. Will post my results!

    Thanks Hadley, AL, and anyone else who has contributed to this - really appreciated.

    We just need to figure out a way now to get the remote control to update it's display when the heatpump settings are changed via the cn105 port ;)
  50. Jakob A - Monday, 23 January 2017 on blog post Hacking a Mitsubishi Heat Pump / Air Conditioner
    Hi guys!

    Greetings from Sweden!
    I have a MSZ-SF35VE2 and wanted to try this.
    I used a USB to TTL adapter and Hadleys python code. It works nice!
    I have ordered an ESP-01, and I will try it once I get it in the mail.

    However, this model has an "i-save" mode, which allows you to set the temperature down to 10 C. I want to be able to set this mode, but looking at the code it doesn't look like it supports that.
    Of course I tried to set it from the remote and see what happens, this is what I saw in the debug print outs:
    isave 10 degrees, heat, fan auto, vane swing:
    HP Packet: 0x62 : 02,00,00,01,01,0f,00,07,00,00,03,94,00,00,00,00 : 0xac

    isave 16 degrees, heat, fan auto, vane swing:
    HP Packet: 0x62 : 02,00,00,01,01,0f,00,07,00,00,03,a0,00,00,00,00 : 0xa0

    heat 16 degrees, heat, fan auto, vane swing:
    HP Packet: 0x62 : 02,00,00,01,01,0f,00,07,00,00,03,a0,00,00,00,00 : 0xa0

    The only thing that changes, as far as I can see, is the 12th byte.
    "94" for 10 degrees, "a0" for 16 degrees.
    I tried setting the temperature to 31 C, and it changes to "be"

    Do you have any good guesses on this?